CraftBot Introduces the CraftBot 3 3D Printer to Expansive Product Line

CraftBot has added the new CraftBot 3 to its expansive range of 3D printers. This professional-grade desktop machine offers dual extrusion printing, an advance filament monitoring system, and a 374 x 250 x 250mm build volume. 

The desktop 3D printer market has become increasingly crowded with endless options, making it difficult to decide which machine is the right match for you. For those who want a 3D printer that is highly capable, affordable and respected across the 3D printing community, look no further than the Hungarian-based company CraftBot.

After raising more than $245,000 in their 2014 Indiegogo campaign, CraftBot set upon its journey to develop plug and play machines that are easy to use and provide impeccable quality. Thus far, the 3D printer manufacturer appears to be succeeding at that goal. CraftBot has released a number of FDM 3D printers, including the flagship CraftBot Plus and CraftBot 2. In fact, the CraftBot Plus was awarded as the Best Plug N’ Play 3D Printer by 3D Hubs in 2016, 2017, and 2018.


The award-winning CraftBot Plus

A closer look at CraftBot as a company showcases exactly what makes their product line so unique and highly praised by the community. Each CraftBot 3D printer is manufactured in Europe, and both software and hardware development is entirely done in-house by a team of highly qualified technicians. The company takes all of their customers’ feedback into account, allowing them to constantly improve and refine their 3D printers.

Now, to add to its expansive product line, CraftBot has been working on a dual extrusion 3D printer that goes above and beyond what we usually find on the consumer market.


The CraftBot 3 3D Printer Strikes Balance Between Affordability and Professional Quality

Following their success with the popular CraftBot Plus and CraftBot 2, the Hungarian manufacturer has now released CraftBot 3 – The Supervisor. With a superhero-like name, it’s no surprise that this desktop dual extrusion 3D printer has some magical features. At $2,199, the CraftBot 3 is incredibly affordable compared to similar dual extrusion machines.

The CraftBot 3 utilizes an Independent Dual Extrusion (IDEX) system, meaning that the two print heads operate independently from one another. Therefore, users can print two objects at once, or use PVA support material to produce more complex parts. Equipped with silicone discs, the nozzles are wiped clean while the print heads are changing, ensuring that excess filament material doesn’t muddle up the surface of your print.


While dual extrusion might seem like the main attraction here, the CraftBot 3 is jam-packed with impressive features that promote quality and accessibility. For starters, there’s a state-of-the-art filament monitoring system (FMS) that keeps track of filament consumption, provides troubleshooting when a filament jam is detected and sends messages to the user when manual intervention is required.

With the CraftBot 3, you’ll get a sizable build volume of 374 x 250 x 250mm (270 x 250X 250mm for dual extrusion and 187 x 250 x 250mm for multi-part printing). This printer is capable of printing at a layer resolution of 50 microns when using the 0.25mm nozzle. And, if you’re concerned about keeping the family up while you print the night away, rest assured that the CraftBot 3 motor control makes this 3D printer more quiet than ever before.

Despite the low price point, “The Supervisor” is engineered to deal with professional-grade materials. The full-metal hotend makes it possible to print at a temperature as high as 300°C, expanding the range of compatible materials beyond the usual suspects. It’s also equipped with high-accuracy ball screws to improve overall print quality.


The CraftBot team has implemented optimized object cooling technology into their latest dual extrusion machine, making it easy to print small objects at an exceptional resolution. The heated bed is designed to prevent warping and sticking, and can be easily removed once your print is complete.

The new 3D printer by CraftBot uses different colored LED status indicators to signal the current status of printing that can be customized for an even better experience. Using WiFi connectivity and CraftBot’s mobile app, users can upload 3D models to the printer, start and stop print jobs, and even control various printing settings from a remote location.


License: The text of “CraftBot Introduces the CraftBot 3 3D Printer to Expansive Product Line” by All3DP is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Subscribe to updates from All3DP

You are subscribed to updates from All3DP

250-389-3780

3D software and 3D printing service provider Materialise has reported its financial results for the third quarter of 2018. For the period ended September 30, 2018, the company reported a revenue increase of 44.6% up to €46.7 million, over €32.3 million for the same period in 2017.

A strong performance across all segments: Materialise Medical, Materialise Software and particularly Materialise Manufacturing (including metal casting expertise from recently acquired ACTech) are credited with driving the rise.

Fried Vancraen, Founder and CEO of Materialise who won the 2018 3D Printing Industry Outstanding Contribution Award says, “What makes me particularly proud and confident in the future is that in every segment, the focus on a continuous improvement of our operational excellence has not refrained our teams from simultaneously strengthening our strategic product and positioning,”

“[…] Based on the general state of performance, we can confidently conclude that the backbone systems [sic.] Materialise has been developing for additive manufacturing are well-positioned to power the growth of additive manufacturing for our customers in many application fields.”

Fried Vancraen, CEO of Materialise, and 2018 winner of the 3D Printing Industry Outstanding Contribution Award. Photo via Materialise
Fried Vancraen, CEO of Materialise. Photo via Materialise

Materialise revenue by segment

Materialise Medical encompasses the company’s design and production services for healthcare specialists. This segment includes sales of anatomical models, surgical planning guides, and 3D printed patient specific implants. Though the Materialise Mimics Innovation Suite software could also be counted in the medical segment, it is unclear whether this and related metal programs are recorded under Materialise Software instead.

Revenue for the Materialise Medical segment in Q3 2018 was reported at  €12.8 million, up 23% on revenue from Q3 2017 which was reported at  €10.4 million.

The backbone of Materialise’s business, the Materialise Software segment encompasses the company’s Magics Suite of products including the e-Stage platform recently launched for metal additive, Materialise Build Processor, Materialise Control Platform, Materialise Inspector and other packages.

In Q3 2018, revenue for Materialise Software was reported at €9.8 million, compared to Q3 2017 reported revenue of €8.4 million.

And finally, assuming 51% of the total revenue for the quarter Materialise Manufacturing, consisting of engineering consultancy services, co-creation, rapid prototyping and other end-use additive manufacturing applications, reported a Q3 2018 revenue of €24 million. For the same period in 2017, Materialise Manufacturing revenue was reported at €13.4 million, producing a variance of 78%.

Revenues Q3 FY2018 Q3 FY 2017 Variance £ millions %
Materialise Software 9,874 8,422 1,452 17.24%
Materialise Medical 12,824 10,421 2,403 23.06%
Materialsie Manufacturing 24,012 13,456 10,556 78.45%
Total segments 46,710 32,299 14,411 44.62%

Highlights and guidance

Other highlights for Q3 2018 at Materialise include a net profit of €2.3 million, or €0.04 per diluted share, compared to a net loss of €1.4 million, or -€0.03 for the same period in 2017. The company generated a gross profit of €26.4 million for the three months ended 30 September 2018, compared to a gross profit of €17.9 million in Q3 2017.

Revenue so far for the year, for the nine months ended Q3 2018, is €135.7 million, up from €97.8 million for the same nine months of 2017.

Consolidated revenue guidance for the full year 2018 was previously expected to be between €180 million and €185 million. In light of the most recent quarter and the nine months ended September 30, 2018 Peter Lays, Executive Chairman of Materialise, confirms that the company expects to be hitting there higher end of this range.

BASF update and Formnext teaser 

Within the third quarter of FY2018, Materialise announced a €22 million strategic investment in award winning material developer and chemical giant BASF. Giving an update on the progress of this partnership Vancraen confirms that “several projects have been started and several actions have been implemented to execute on the strategic collaboration with BASF,” throughout Q3 2018, though the first product of these efforts isn’t expected until some point in 2019.

Providing a preview of what to expect at the upcoming Formnext exhibition in Frankfurt, Vancraen added, ” […] we’ll deliver another proof of this fruitful interaction between our manufacturing and software segments with a full release of the metal simulation module in Magics,”

“This simulation module which was announced almost a year ago in collaboration with Simufact is the result of extensive internal experimentation.”

Full Materialise Third Quarter 2018 Results can be viewed online here.

Materialise Simulation Module 4. Image via Materialise.
Materialise Simulation Module 4. Image via Materialise.

Stay up to date with 3D printing financials this season, subscribe to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter, follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

Seeking jobs in software development? Make your profile on 3D Printing Jobs, or advertise to find experts in your area.

Featured image shows the Materialise Mammoth 3D printer facility in Leuven, Belgium. Photo via Materialise.

Prints With Programmable Rigidity Control Present Medical Applications


One of the core problems with fixing complex cardiac tissues and vessels is that of getting replacement parts to behave like the real thing. Take heart disease for example: hardening blood vessels present an issue that makes them hard to replace. That’s why a team of researchers at Colorado University is using 3D printing as a means of producing artificial blood vessels with programmable rigidity control. As a result, they’ve been able to accurately mimic the blood and oxygen flow present in the human body.

The research uses a fine-grained, programmable control over rigidity achieved via elaborate layering. Through the method, the researchers can print objects with the same shape, size and materials while displaying variable rigidities. The researchers printing these items with a high-resolution desktop printer (the biomaterials were as small as 10 microns). The key is to control oxygen migration, while simultaneously managing flexibility and size.

“This is a profound development and an encouraging first step toward our goal of creating structures that function like a healthy cell should function,” said Xiaobo Yin, CU mechanical engineering associate professor and the study’s senior author. “The idea was to add independent mechanical properties to 3D structures that can mimic the body’s natural tissue.”

Medical Applications

Prints With Programmable Rigidity Control Present Medical Applications

This technology allows researchers to create customisable microstructures for any patient’s disease models.   The researchers demonstrated this by printing various models with programmable rigidity control. The level of control comes courtesy of varying up the rod rigidity as shown in the image above. This creates items that display a level of flexibility without altering their other properties. The prints come in 3 combinations: soft/soft, hard/soft and hard/hard (from left to right in the picture).

“The challenge is to create an even finer scale for the chemical reactions,” Yin said. “But we see tremendous opportunity ahead for this technology and the potential for artificial tissue fabrication.”

The research could lead to many potential improvements in cardiology. It has a particular potential in solving the issues associated with hypertension and hardening vessels. As with many other forms of medical 3D printing, the greatest benefit is the patient specific care it provides. Doctors could alter the process, size and rigidity for each different patient. While the research is still young, it has immense potential in creating medical bio-structures as well. Perhaps it may also prove useful for simplistic nanomachines in the future.

Featured image courtesy of Colorado University.

Cooper Hewitt’s National Design Award Winner Joe Doucet Always Places Sustainability at the Forefront

Artist: Joe Doucet / Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Photo: Donatello Arm

For world-renowned designer Joe Doucet, using 3D printing to create products that have a minimal environmental impact was never an afterthought. To Doucet, sustainability is key to the future of design.

“I’ve always been interested in new technologies, particularly ones that have the ability to be transformative in terms of manufacturing,” Doucet told Shapeways. “If you look at it from the fact that 3D printing allows each and every object to be unique and customized completely without creating the waste — both in terms of excess material and freights and shipping — it’s just a fundamental shift in the way that we create and consume products.”

Launching his 3D design career

Doucet is no stranger to the world of 3D design. He began using 3D printing for his first project back in 2000 and hasn’t stopped since. Shortly after that, Doucet discovered Shapeways and saw how cost and time efficient the company was when it came to prototyping (“I used Shapeways…to visualize what the final product would be like,” he said). So when it came time to launch his company OTHR, it only made sense to partner with Shapeways.

“We’ve had a long history with Shapeways. During the launch of OTHR, we formalized a partnership and a relationship with Shapeways to be really one of our main suppliers and partners.”

And now, National Design Award winning designer Doucet is using Shapeways to help curate a current exhibition in New York City that is open through April 14, 2019.

Tableware through the centuries on display

Artist: Joe Doucet / Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Video: Donatello Arm

The exhibition — which is titled Tablescapes: Designs for Dining, and is currently open to the public — confronted Doucet with a challenge: How do you use design to create solutions for the decrease in resources we see in the world? As resources get more limited, how do you make that less dystopian? How do you take these resources and make them into a beautiful experience of eating?

The exhibition is broken up into three sections: One depicting dining ware in the 19th century, another in the 20th century and a final section focused on dining and tableware in the 21st century. The 19th-century room is an artistic masterpiece bringing viewers back to the time of Napoleon III. The 20th-century room, on the other hand, shows the shift that occurred towards mass production of products. And finally, the 21st-century room paints a picture of the sustainable future we see a glimpse of today.

“When we were tasked to design the tableware and dinnerware for the 21st century…obviously to me, the decentralization of manufacturing and the addition of technology, being able to reduce the carbon footprints and allow infinite customization, was key to representing what the 21st century will be,” Doucet told Shapeways.

Partnering with Shapeways to find the perfect materials

Once Doucet was aware of the way he wished to construct each section of the exhibit, he went back to Shapeways to find the best materials and printing processes to use.

“We partnered with Shapeways quite early on in the process to explore different manufacturing techniques in terms of 3D printing to be able to create all the final pieces you’ll see at the exhibit. Shapeways is the sole producer of the tableware and cutlery.”

He adds, “It was a very hands-on process and Shapeways was closely involved. There were five or six different materials and processes that were considered in the beginning, and we essentially prototyped everything with all of these different available materials and printing techniques. We met at the Shapeways headquarters in New York and went through all the benefits and different quality levels that we were able to achieve.”

After much time spent on reviewing each material and printing option, calculating the benefits of each, Doucet and the Shapeways team were able to agree on the best way to create the products for the exhibit.

“I think we were all incredibly pleased with the results and quite surprised with the level of execution that we were able to achieve with the products that are on display now. They’re really stunning.”

Producing completely functional products

A highlight of the exhibit lies in Doucet’s vision to create products that can be used for cooking, serving and storing food. In the 21st-century room, the place settings can be used for all three functions, “as opposed to having three separate sets of containers for each step in that process. We decided it was best to eliminate as much as we could.”

Artist: Joe Doucet / Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Photo: Donatello Arm

“You’ll notice that on the objects, there’s this raised pattern, and it’s there not just to be a decorative element but they, in fact, would act as heat sinks to be able to distribute heat quickly in terms of the cooking process and then to quickly dissipate in the serving process,” Doucet said. “So you could take something from a microwave and put it on the table and the vessel would become cool to the touch very quickly.”

If anything, Doucet’s experience partnering with Shapeways and curating the Tablescapes: Designs for Dining exhibition was yet another clear indication of where the future of 3D printing lies.

Doucet explains, “It should be, at this point, fairly easy to see how 3D printing is going to fundamentally revolutionize how things are made. And I think companies like Shapeways, and Shapeways in particular, are really [game changers] in making this industrial revolution accessible to [anyone] at the touch of a button.”

Joe Doucet’s “Tablescapes: Designs for Dining” exhibition is on view now at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum through April 14, 2019.

Want more exclusive interviews with leading 3D designers? Sign up to our email list

Flexy Skeleton #3DThursday #3DPrinting « Adafruit Industries – Makers, hackers, artists, designers and engineers!

Every week we’ll 3D print designs from the community and showcase slicer settings, use cases and of course, Time-lapses!

Bends Skeleton
Huang You Liang
/www.thingiverse.com/make:469231
Ultimaker s5
Mint PLA
9hrs 15min
X:301 Y:220 Z:13mm
.2mm layer / .4mm nozzle
20% Infill / 6.5mm retract
210C / 60C
90g


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

Stop breadboarding and soldering – start making immediately! Adafruit’s Circuit Playground is jam-packed with LEDs, sensors, buttons, alligator clip pads and more. Build projects with Circuit Playground in a few minutes with the drag-and-drop MakeCode programming site, learn computer science using the CS Discoveries class on code.org, jump into CircuitPython to learn Python and hardware together, or even use Arduino IDE. Circuit Playground Express is the newest and best Circuit Playground board, with support for MakeCode, CircuitPython, and Arduino. It has a powerful processor, 10 NeoPixels, mini speaker, InfraRed receive and transmit, two buttons, a switch, 14 alligator clip pads, and lots of sensors: capacitive touch, IR proximity, temperature, light, motion and sound. A whole wide world of electronics and coding is waiting for you, and it fits in the palm of your hand.

Join 8,500+ makers on Adafruit’s Discord channels and be part of the community! /adafru.it/discord

CircuitPython – Python on Microcontrollers is here!

Have an amazing project to share? Join the SHOW-AND-TELL every Wednesday night at 7:30pm ET on Google+ Hangouts.

Join us every Wednesday night at 8pm ET for Ask an Engineer!

Follow Adafruit on Instagram for top secret new products, behinds the scenes and more /www.instagram.com/adafruit/

Get the only spam-free daily newsletter about wearables, running a “maker business”, electronic tips and more! Subscribe at AdafruitDaily.com !

No comments yet.

Adafruit has a “be excellent to each other” comment policy. Help us keep the community here positive and helpful. Stick to the topic, be respectful of makers of all ages and skill levels. Be kind, and don’t spam – Thank you!

Weekend Project: 3D Print a Bloody or Stitched Neck for Your Halloween Costume

Add some fright to your spine-chilling costume with this collection of Halloween-themed 3D printed jewelry, which includes a stitched neck and dripping bloody neck. 

Do you need to add some extra dread to your undead aesthetic? One Instructables user who goes by the name of Penolopy Bulnick has recently shared a collection of 3D printed Halloween jewelry that will complement the most terrifying of costumes. Her latest designs include a dripping bloody neck, as well as a stitched neck and wrists.

This collection of Halloween-themed accessories are easy to make and actually look pretty realistic, making them ideal for anyone planning to go to dress up as a zombie, vampire, or Frankenstein for an upcoming costume party. The designer has shared a handful of 3D printable models that vary in size and thickness, as well as the Tinkercad files so you can customize them yourself.

With just a few affordable jewelry pieces and these 3D printed effects, you can attach dripping blood or stitches directly to your throat. Let your friends stare in horror as you parade your gory trinkets around the neighborhood. Let’s take a look at how you can 3D print your own creepy jewelry for the haunted holiday ahead.

Also, be sure to check out our other Halloween-themed Weekend Projects for more ideas:


3D Printed Halloween Jewelry: What You Need & How to Build it

You can find the STL files for the stitched neck and dripping bloody neck on the designer’s Instructables post. There, she also goes over the design process for both pieces, explaining how she created them on Tinkercad.

The supply list needed to create this jewelry collection is quite short. You can either use red and black filament (Penolopy Bulnick recommends Iron Red and Black from Hatchbox3D) or spray paint once the print is complete. Aside from your 3D printer and filament, here’s what else you need to make your own bloody or stitched neck:


Since these designs are so thin, you don’t really need flexible filament to wear them. However, if you want to print a thicker version or improve the comfort a bit, a flexible material like TPU might be worth investing in. Otherwise, when loading these models into your 3D printing slicer software, double check them to make sure they aren’t too thick. If you decide to print the thicker version of the bloody neck with regular filament, the band of the design should only be two layers high.

The next step is dependent on what color filament you’re using. If you’ve already got the right color extruding out of your nozzle, there’s no need to worry about spray painting. For those who don’t have any red or black filament, or want to use paint to enhance the gruesomeness of the jewelry, you can just color the side of the print that will be on display. The designer uses a sealer after painting to give her slit neck a more glossy effect.

Next, add the jump rings to the corners of the print, followed by the clasp and necklace chain. Both the bloody neck and stitches are designed to be worn as a choker, so make sure the chain is long enough, but not too long. And that’s about all it takes to add some terrifying jewelry to your Halloween costume!

If you don’t have a 3D printer, you can also visit the designer’s Etsy shop and purchase the Halloween-themed jewelry for $7.



License: The text of “Weekend Project: 3D Print a Bloody or Stitched Neck for Your Halloween Costume” by All3DP is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Subscribe to updates from All3DP

You are subscribed to updates from All3DP

Nike’s 3D printed elite shoe preparing for a wider release

Nike’s 3D printed shoe Zoom VaporFly Elite Flyprint 3D will soon get a wider release. The Flyprint 3D is the updated version of the famous 3D printed Nike Zoom Vaporfly 4%, designed with the help of Eliud Kipchoge, winner Berlin marathon 2018.

The Beaverton-based footwear giant has worked to perfect the Vaporfly 4% since last year. For this purpose, the company once again recruited the help of Kipchoge.

Their collaboration produced the updated Zoom VaporFly Elite Flyprint 3D.

The Zoom VaporFly Elite Flyprint 3D. Image via Nike
The Zoom VaporFly Elite Flyprint 3D. Image via Nike

Updated Zoom Vaporfly 4%

The Zoom Vaporfly is called “4%” because an independent research found that Vaporfly wearing runners can gain 4% of the lead time on their competitors.

The authors of the paper A Comparison of the Energetic Cost of Running in Marathon Racing Shoes, say, “the prototype shoes[Vaporfly 4%] lowered the energetic cost of running by 4 percent on average. We predict that with these shoes, top athletes could run substantially faster and achieve the first sub-2-hour marathon.”

The success of the Vaporfly 4% prompted the Nike Footwear Design team to visit Eliud Kipchoge at his running cam in Western Kenya.

With the help of direct feedback from Kipchoge, Nike upgraded the Vaporfly 4% to bring the new Zoom VaporFly Elite Flyprint 3D.

The VaporFly Elite Flyprint 3D is 11 gram lighter than the Vaporfly 4%. One of the prime focus of the design team was to make running shoes for wet conditions. VaporFly Elite Flyprint has a 3D printed upper which prevents moisture from getting inside the shoe.

In praise of the Flyprint, Kipchoge said, “I had to take the shoe, put it on my foot and run on it. To get the comfortability of the shoe, the friendliness of the upper, how the 3-D printed part holds my foot, that’s what I was looking for in this shoe.”

“RUNNING WITH THE VAPORFLY ELITE FLYPRINT, YOU FEEL LIKE FLYING WHEN YOU ARE RUNNING.”

The patterned fabric used in the Zoom VaporFly Elite Flyprint 3D. Image via Nike
The patterned fabric used in the Zoom VaporFly Elite Flyprint 3D. Image via Nike

3D printed footwear

The fashion industry has been active in providing customized solutions and using 3D printing for mass production.

Among these companies are the two titans of the footwear industry: Adidas and Reebok.

Adidas in collaboration with Carbon 3D designed a 3D printed Futurecraft 4D shoes. The 3D printed shoe is planned for mass customization and production. Another of Adidas product is the 3D printed Y-3 sneakers which cost $20,000.

In another news report, Reebok and BASF partnered to release a limited edition of 3D printed sneakers.

For more news from the fashion industry subscribe to our 3D printing newsletter. And join us on Facebook and 5626010295.

Visit our 3D Printing Jobs to start a new career.

Featured image shows Zoom VaporFly Elite Flyprint 3D. Image via Nike

(888) 244-3318


Iro3D made quite a splash a few months ago when they announced their $5,000 metal 3D printer. While $5,000 might seem quite hefty, it’s quite a reasonable price for a metal printer. Now, Iro3D just announced that they’ve already shipped out quite a few of their new machines. With a move towards international shipping, the company’s SPD metal technology has just made it’s first foray onto the global stage.

Initially, the printer was exclusively available in the Seattle area and only as a Beta version. Now, Iro3D appear to be distributing to the rest of the US, as well as Canada and Hong Kong, where they have sold a select number of devices to various firms. The printer has been available for pre-orders since May of this year and Iro3D have sold 4 of their printers already.

The company has also clarified certain specifications for the printer and the SPD metal printing process. It has a build volume of 300x300x100 mm and Iron and support powders cost $5 per pound. They claim that it works with high-carbon steel, copper-iron, copper-nickel, mild steel, copper-silver, copper-gold, silver-gold, gold-nickel and silver-nickel. Similarly, mild steel would require a higher temperature kiln, whereas metals like aluminum, stainless steel, titanium, would require further research and a kiln with controlled atmosphere, like vacuum and argon. It’s an impressive range of metals, nonetheless.

Selective Powder Deposition Technology

As we reported previously: the printer uses a multi-step process requiring the production of a crucible from sand and metal powders. Users have to then process this crucible into the eventual product. The printer does away with a lot of the standard parts expected of additive manufacturing. It has no fans, heat beds, and hot ends for example. It boasts a 0.3mm layer resolution and has a 1mm pourer (its alternative for a hot end).

Much of this is same and Iro3D have carried it over to the latest version. The process has distinct advantages like being cheaper and having no shrinkage. However, there is about 2% shape distortion when baked in a stainless steel crucible, due to the horizontal thermal expansion crucibles undergo. Although, users can mitigate this with ceramic crucibles.

Iro3D Now Shipping $5,000 SPD Metal Printer

The process also requires post-processing. Iro3D state that “after filling the crucible with the powders, you would need to bake it in a kiln. For high-carbon steel the temperature is 1250°C, hold time is 3 hours. For copper-iron and copper-nickel the temperature is 1184°C, hold time is 2 hours.” Inside the kiln, the filler metal melts and the metal powder absorbs it due to capillary action.

The capillary action creates adhesive force to overpower the cohesive force and create an attraction between liquid metal particles and powder metal. Consequently, the liquid metal fills up the gaps between the powdered particles brings those particles up to the same temperature to form a kind of eutectic alloy. This is one of the reasons sand it used, since it’s so dissimilar to metal powder it can’t undergo capillary action.

One of the downsides is that the the process can be quite a bit slow. It also requires the kiln which can cost quite a bit (completely new can be one for $1,000). Iro3D also do not sell their own consumables and materials for printing, which users can acquire from 3rd parties. Considering that the printer costs $5,000 (plus shipping), it still manages to be cheaper and more accessible than many machines out there.

Featured image courtesy of Iro3D.

Make Order Management a Breeze with Shopify Integration

It’s that time of year again. Colorful leaves and pumpkin-spiced drinks can only mean one thing – the holiday season is just around the corner. To be more specific, we are only 36 days away from Black Friday!

If you plan to or are already selling 3D products, it’s time to prepare your business for holiday shoppers. We highly recommend using our new integration with Shopify, the Shapeways Fulfillment app (see step-by-step setup instructions here). Not sure whether this is something you need? We’re here to help you make that decision.

The Shapeways Fulfillment App

This integration directly connects a Shopify store to Shapeways’ 3D printing manufacturing and fulfillment network, giving your business seamless access to 3D printing technology in over 40 materials and finishes. When your customer makes a purchase from your Shopify store, the order will flow through to Shapeways and can be fulfilled manually or automatically, depending on your business needs.

Who Is It For?

It’s for anyone who wishes to sell 3D models and have the orders fulfilled by Shapeways. The two accounts you need to set up are:

  1. A Shapeways account: you can sell any or all products on your Shapeways shop, if you have one, or you can sell private models uploaded to your Shapeways account.
  2. A Shopify store: there are multiple plans available, but you can always start with a free trial to test it out.

Integration Benefits

  • Access batch ordering – Eliminate repetitive order entries all together.
  • Automate customer orders – Orders can be processed immediately and automatically.
  • Print on demand in over 40 3D printed materials and finishes – No need to stock inventory or worry about products collecting dust on shelves.
  • Print without your own 3D manufacturing equipment – You will have access to Shapeways’ 3D printing manufacturing and fulfillment network.
  • Ship directly to you or your customers – Shapeways can package and ship orders straight to your customers. We can also ship them to you for additional processing.

 

Our early app adopters are enjoying the benefits of keeping customers on their own storefronts, and being able to go on vacation knowing that orders will take care of themselves in reaching the customers. If that sounds appealing to you, give the integration a try. And if you need assistance, we’re here to help you at storefronts@shapeways.com.

Moon for Young Living Desert Mist diffuser #3DThursday #3DPrinting « Adafruit Industries – Makers, hackers, artists, designers and engineers!

eddyogi shares:

Cut holes to fit a Young Living Desert Mist diffuser

download the files on: /www.thingiverse.com/thing:3160087


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

Stop breadboarding and soldering – start making immediately! Adafruit’s Circuit Playground is jam-packed with LEDs, sensors, buttons, alligator clip pads and more. Build projects with Circuit Playground in a few minutes with the drag-and-drop MakeCode programming site, learn computer science using the CS Discoveries class on code.org, jump into CircuitPython to learn Python and hardware together, or even use Arduino IDE. Circuit Playground Express is the newest and best Circuit Playground board, with support for MakeCode, CircuitPython, and Arduino. It has a powerful processor, 10 NeoPixels, mini speaker, InfraRed receive and transmit, two buttons, a switch, 14 alligator clip pads, and lots of sensors: capacitive touch, IR proximity, temperature, light, motion and sound. A whole wide world of electronics and coding is waiting for you, and it fits in the palm of your hand.

Join 8,500+ makers on Adafruit’s Discord channels and be part of the community! /adafru.it/discord

CircuitPython – Python on Microcontrollers is here!

Have an amazing project to share? Join the SHOW-AND-TELL every Wednesday night at 7:30pm ET on Google+ Hangouts.

Join us every Wednesday night at 8pm ET for Ask an Engineer!

Follow Adafruit on Instagram for top secret new products, behinds the scenes and more /www.instagram.com/adafruit/

Get the only spam-free daily newsletter about wearables, running a “maker business”, electronic tips and more! Subscribe at AdafruitDaily.com !

No comments yet.

Adafruit has a “be excellent to each other” comment policy. Help us keep the community here positive and helpful. Stick to the topic, be respectful of makers of all ages and skill levels. Be kind, and don’t spam – Thank you!

Copyright © 2018 905-935-7398